About

“One of the most talented pianists of his generation”
– Joseph Patrych, WFUV

Phenomenal virtuosity”
– MusicWeb-International.com

“Profound musical consciousness”
– Michel Le Naour, Piano 21

A true piano genius”
– Anthony Newman

Hailed a “true piano genius” (Anthony Newman) and  “one of the most talented pianists of his generation” (Joseph Patrych, WFUV), renowned for “phenomenal virtuosity” (MusicWeb International) and “profound musical consciousness” (Michel Le Naour, Piano 21), Matthew Cameron’s original piano works and transcriptions have attained worldwide popularity, collecting over a million views on the internet, and are heard on the Arabesque, Cala, Delos, and Sony/BMG labels. His career as piano virtuoso has taken him to Carnegie Hall for a heralded sold-out debut, from venerable venues like the Salle Erard in Paris, to trendy classical hotspots like Teatro del Sale in Florence, Italy. A series of recordings on the Arabesque Records label and on Cala Records have received accolades in the American Record Guide, Fanfare Magazine, inspiring Audiophile Audition to say that “Cameron equals anyone who champions Liszt” with performances “that could not be bettered” (MusicWeb), and a recording of the 24 Chopin Etudes that “is up there with the very best available” (MusicWeb). His original piano works and transcriptions are published by G. Schirmer Editions and IMC Editions, and have been performed by himself and others at Salle Gaveau in Paris, Il Bagno Konzertgalerie in Germany, the Michel Sogny Festival in Switzerland, Oji Hall in Tokyo, Musashino Cultural Foundation in Japan, Shanghai Concert Hall, Sayed Darwish Theter in Cairo, Husum Piano Rarities Festival in Germany, Festival Pianistyczny in Warsaw, and in Strasbourg, Montpellier, Estonia, Greece, Yugoslavia, Spain, and Austria. Winner of multiple awards at the 2004 Franz Liszt International Piano Competition in Los Angeles. Broadcasts include solo spots on New York’s WNYC and WQXR Radio. He is director of Evening Piano Concerts at the South Oxford Space in Brooklyn, New York, and joins the faculty of the Summit Music Festival and the Brooklyn College Preparatory Center for the Performing Arts in 2016. Matthew Cameron is a Steinway Artist since 2012.

At his 2008 Weill Hall debut at Carnegie Hall, he received a standing ovation from a sold-out audience, after which the New York Concert Review reported: “Resembling Franz Liszt from the stage…he distinguished himself from his many brilliant peers by projecting a composer’s command of his repertoire. Though some might be cynical of “channeling Liszt” nowadays, Cameron’s genuine involvement and sensitivity suspended disbelief.MC1

Cameron has given two notable premiers: In 2009 he collaborated with five other pianist-composers via the internet to create the “Hexameron: Book II” based on and structured after the Hexameron Variations of 1837, which he premiered at the 2010 American Liszt Society annual festival. Later that year came the European premier of the same work at the Palace of Count Niccolo Capponi in Florence, Italy, at the inauguration of the Capponi Cultural Studies Institute, performing for representatives of the EU, and again that year at the Salle Erard in Paris. He also gave the world-premier of the recently-discovered Konzertstueck for Piano and Orchestra composed in 1845 by Carl Filtsch, student of Chopin.

matthewHiRescroppedjpegA former prodigy who performed in the legendary “monster concerts” of Eugene List as a child, Matthew Cameron was born in Brooklyn, New York, where he began playing the piano at age 3, displaying perfect pitch and the most natural technique and memory.  At 9 he played his own compositions for Agustin Anievas, who began teaching him.  Later studies were with Jenny David and Efrem Briskin, with coachings from Constance Keene.  He also worked with eminent pianist and musicologist Charles Rosen, student of Moritz Rosenthal, who was in turn a student of Liszt. Thus his awareness of color, tone, and commitment to continuing the legacy of the virtuoso pianist-composer in the 19c. tradition.

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© 2015 Matthew Cameron.   All Rights Reserved.

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